How To Take More Creative Environmental Travel Portraits

The post How To Take More Creative Environmental Travel Portraits appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Kevin Landwer-Johan.

Including people in your travel photos creates a stronger sense of connection for anyone who views your photos. Environmental travel portraits add depth of interest to any album, presentation or book of travel images.

Adding a person to a landscape, cultural location, or market scene will almost always add appeal to the photo. Capturing locals engrossed in what they are doing can make for a more interesting picture. Stopping to chat with them and asking if you can take their portrait means a scene takes on a whole new dynamic.

Environmental travel portraits are photos of people involved in the setting they are in. They are usually connected in some way with the location. A regular portrait will typically be cropped tighter and contain little contextual information.

© Kevin Landwer-Johan Nikon D800, Lens 35mm f1.4, 1/160 sec., f/2.8, ISO 1600

This is an environmental portrait of a Karen woman cooking in her home. The composition contains visual information about her lifestyle and where she lives.

Continue reading
  236 Hits
  0 Comments
236 Hits
0 Comments

Creatively Using the New Lightroom Hue Control

The post Creatively Using the New Lightroom Hue Control appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Rick Ohnsman.

Shop for items online and you’re often offered color choices. Would you like that hat in red, orange, blue, green, tan or teal? Click on the item, select your desired color, and the item will change to reflect your color choice.

Now, how about if you could selectively change the color of items in your photos without affecting other colors in the image? Maybe you bought the orange hat, took a photo of yourself in it, and wished you’d instead picked the blue one. No problem, don’t return the hat; you can change its color in your photo with the new Adobe Lightroom Hue Control.

One photo, many color variations using the Lightroom Hue Control tool.

Global versus local adjustments

Reach for the Exposure slider in the Develop Module of Lightroom, and slide it left and right. You will see the entire image get lighter or darker. Any of the other sliders will affect the image similarly. Controls which affect the entire image are called global.

What if you want to adjust just a portion of the image? Brighten up that one tree, do some dodging and burning, bring up the saturation of a sunset, make adjustments that affect only certain areas?

Continue reading
  199 Hits
  0 Comments
199 Hits
0 Comments

Sony Announces the a7S III, With 4K/120p and a 9.44M-dot EVF

The post Sony Announces the a7S III, With 4K/120p and a 9.44M-dot EVF appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jaymes Dempsey.

After months of rumors, it’s finally official:

The Sony a7S III will hit the shelves in September, offering a whole host of brand new features, including a stellar autofocus system, a class-leading electronic viewfinder, pro-level video recording capabilities, and much more.

Let’s take a closer look.

What is the Sony a7S III?

The a7S III is Sony’s latest video/stills hybrid camera, which replaces the a7S II (a camera that debuted way back in 2015 and was long overdue for an upgrade).

Continue reading
  174 Hits
  0 Comments
174 Hits
0 Comments

Step-by-step Guide to Long Exposure Photography

The post Step-by-step Guide to Long Exposure Photography appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Francesco Gola.

In the past few years, thanks to the diffusion of useful accessories and photographic filters with good quality and low prices, the technique of long exposure has become increasingly popular among photography enthusiasts. Even if this technique can be used both in the studio and in an urban environment, the perfect playground for long exposures is landscape photography.

Unfortunately, it often happens that the result we get is far from our expectations, and we end up classifying the long exposure as an impossible technique. However, following this step-by-step guide to long exposure photography, you’ll see how easy it is to get a good result on the first attempt (or almost!).

Step One: Study the weather

A day with a cloudless sky is a good day to drink a beer with friends, not to make long exposures. Likewise, it cannot rain forever, so do not resign yourself to an afternoon with your PlayStation. You should study satellite images rather than the meteorological sites, trying to figure out if there is an incoming storm, or if the downpour is about to end.

Step Two: Visit the location well in advance

Scout the location ahead of time, as you need a lot of time to find the perfect composition, or at least more than the time needed for a “short exposure”. In fact, in a long exposure, the world is completely different from how you see it with your own eyes. You have to try to see it with your mind, looking for a harmonious composition that includes moving subjects, trying to predict the direction of the clouds or the force of the sea.

Continue reading
  184 Hits
  0 Comments
184 Hits
0 Comments

Posing Guide: 21 Sample Poses to Get You Started with Photographing Men

The post Posing Guide: 21 Sample Poses to Get You Started with Photographing Men appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Guest Contributor.

Previously we’ve created posing guides with suggested sample poses to help you get started posing women (also see part 2 for posing women), posing children, posing couples, posing groups, and posing weddings, so today let’s look at some sample starting poses for photographing men.

Men are usually less comfortable with being photographed, so it’s important to set them at ease with posing in order to get good results.

It is always a good idea to prepare before the photoshoot.

Continue reading
  212 Hits
  0 Comments
212 Hits
0 Comments

Weekly Photography Challenge – ReEdit

The post Weekly Photography Challenge – ReEdit appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Sime.

This week’s weekly photography challenge – ReEdit

Hey! it’s Simon here, I’m our support guy and I look after the dPS Facebook group. This weekend I’ve slipped in to have a go at the weekly challenge as our ed, Caz, is off having a well-deserved break!

What I’ve chosen for this week’s theme is ‘Re-Edit’ and by that, I mean going into wherever you keep your photos and re-editing one in Photoshop or Gimp or PSP or whatever you use! Choose a photograph, change it with a re-edit, see what you can make it into and share it! (Details on how and where to share at the end of this post)

My Cuban Street Scene – The OriginalMy Cuban Street Scene – The Re-edit

The photograph can be of anything you desire, and for extra points, you can share the original and the re-edit if you’d like to. By way of example, you can see my original Cuban street scene above, and I’ve gone ahead and re-edited into a grungy black&white, I’ve done the same again with my Melbourne sunset below, and after its re-edit.

Continue reading
  172 Hits
  0 Comments
172 Hits
0 Comments

4 Ways of Creating Effective Catchlights in Portraiture

The post 4 Ways of Creating Effective Catchlights in Portraiture appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by John McIntire.

Canon 5D Mark III | Canon EF 50mm f/2.5 Macro | 50mm | 1/80 sec | f/5.6 | ISO 100

It is arguable that the most important part of a portrait is your subject’s eyes. While there is a case or two in which this might not be true, for the most part, the eyes are the focal point of portraits. This is because, when we interact with people on a one-to-one basis, it’s the eyes that we use to interact with one another.

As a photographer, it’s vital that you are able to present your subject’s eyes as the focal point in your images. One key way to do this is through the deliberate use and manipulation of catchlights. Catchlights in portraiture are the reflection(s) of your light source(s) that appear in the eyes. 

This article will discuss why catchlights are important, how to make use of them, and how to manipulate them to your benefit. It will also discuss several ways to help you to include catchlights in your portraiture.

What are catchlights?

Catchlights are the reflection of the light source in your subject’s eyes.

As mentioned above, catchlights are the reflections of your light source as they appear in your subject’s eyes. It doesn’t matter if you are using natural light or flash; if there is light going directly into your subject’s eyes, there will be a catchlight.

Continue reading
  172 Hits
  0 Comments
172 Hits
0 Comments

What is Burst Mode and How Can it Benefit Your Photography?

The post What is Burst Mode and How Can it Benefit Your Photography? appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Megan Kennedy.

When it comes to photography, timing can be everything. Whether you are photographing a high-speed car or a static landscape, knowing when to press the shutter button is all-important. But the average human reaction time to a visual stimulus is 0.25 seconds, making photographs of brief opportunities somewhat difficult. Fortunately, when frantically depressing the shutter button just doesn’t cut it, there’s burst mode.

Let’s take a speedy look at burst mode, and how it can benefit your photography.

Burst mode is great for capturing fast-moving subjects. 1/250s | f/9 | ISO 160

What is burst mode?

Burst mode is also known as continuous shooting mode or continuous high-speed mode. It’s a camera function that allows you to make a series of photographs in quick succession. With burst mode activated, a photographer can hold the shutter button down and the camera will take multiple photographs, minimizing the interval between shots.

I used burst mode to capture this moment of a cockatoo eating grass seed. 1/8000s | f/5.6 | ISO 500

When is burst mode used?

Burst mode can be used at any time, but it’s especially useful for fast-moving subjects and fleeting opportunities. Burst mode records moments much faster than capturing an event manually frame-by-frame. This increases the chance of making successful photographs of short-lived moments.

Continue reading
  179 Hits
  0 Comments
179 Hits
0 Comments

Photo Editing with Lightroom Mobile

The post Photo Editing with Lightroom Mobile appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Simon Ringsmuth.

Lightroom Mobile has been around for many years, with the earliest version dating all the way back to 2014. While it is not as popular as its traditional desktop-based counterpart, Lightroom Mobile has grown into a capable and feature-packed editing tool that can hold its own against many other programs.

Editing with Lightroom Mobile isn’t quite the same as editing on Lightroom Classic. But if you take the time to learn, you’ll find that it is up to almost any task you can throw at it.

Nikon D750 | 200mm | 1/4000s | f/22 | ISO 100

The first thing to understand when working with Lightroom Mobile is that it’s not just a mobile version of Lightroom Classic. Lightroom Mobile was written from the ground up to work with phones and tablets, and that meant Adobe had to re-imagine the entire user interface.

Design considerations were also made for the types of edits that people are likely to do on a mobile device. Screen size, touch targets, editing, and navigation; no stone was left unturned when Lightroom Mobile was developed.

Continue reading
  175 Hits
  0 Comments
175 Hits
0 Comments

Understanding Depth of Field for Beginners

The post Understanding Depth of Field for Beginners appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Bruce Wunderlich.

You may have heard the term depth of field (DoF), but if you are new to photography you may not yet be taking advantage of how DoF can enhance your photos.

A basic definition of depth of field is: the zone of acceptable sharpness within a photo that will appear in focus. In every picture there is a certain area of your image in front of, and behind the subject that will appear in focus.

This zone will vary from photo to photo. Some images may have very small zones of focus which is called shallow depth of field.

Here’s a series of images with very shallow depth of field.

Continue reading
  177 Hits
  0 Comments
177 Hits
0 Comments

By accepting you will be accessing a service provided by a third-party external to https://imagemaker.studio/

Rob Robinson, owner and primary photographer/videographer, brings over 30 years of professional experience, education and training to his photography passion and skills.

Rob Robinson | The ImageMaker

129 South Main St., Suite 260,

Grapevine, Texas 76051

817-456-6788 (cell phone)